We always want to hear from people who are interested in the Feltham Convening Project (FCP) and share our passion to collectively improve outcomes for children and young people. 

Please get in touch with a member of the Planning Team if you would like to find out more about how to get involved or just to share your story - we are here to listen and learn!

Mei Lim
Planning Team Lead

Mei has over 13 years experience working across all phases in education. She worked in South East London as a secondary History teacher, before leaving to study a Masters in Public Policy degree for 2 years in Berlin, with a focus on education and social policy. Returning to the UK, she decided to move into the primary phase and was Headteacher of a primary academy in Guildford until December 2018.

During this time, Mei met Ed and was inspired by his vision to develop a complementary model that works alongside schools to support children and families, which is why she joined the Reach Children's Hub in 2019. Mei now oversees the Hub and is excited to be leading the Planning Team for the FCP, as she believes passionately in the importance of building capacity across communities, so that every child can thrive and enjoy a life of choice and opportunity. 

mei.lim@reachfoundation.org.uk

Victoria Hirst
Evaluation Lead

Victoria is the Evaluation Lead for FCP’s Planning Team. She is also in the final year of her PhD, which involves developing an ethnographic case study of the Reach cradle-to-career school design in affiliation with the University of Manchester and the Economic Social and Research Council. The FCP work aligns closely with her research interests which focus on the link between area-based dynamics and educational inequities. Victoria began her career as a secondary school teacher and taught in Wolverhampton and London. In her spare time, she is a youth mentor for a local charity and also enjoys running.

victoria.hirst@reachfoundation.org.uk

Teodor Balint
Evaluation Officer

Teo grew up in Eastern Romania where the symptoms of a corrupt and faulty system sparked a lifelong interest and empathy to work with children. At 16, he and his family had to leave Romania and move to the UK where he studied Psychology, with a particular focus on cognitive development. His passion for working with community-based initiatives started during his MSc, where, as a student of Computational Neuroscience and Cognitive Robotics, Teo focused his research on well-being and resources management in an unbalanced system. Before joining Reach Children's Hub as an Evaluator, Teo taught English as a second language in Spain, Lisbon and Ireland, and worked as a Teaching Assistant throughout London. So far, his work centred around the Early Years, working with local parents, children and practitioners to learn more about the experiences of the Feltham community.

teodor.balint@reachfoundation.org.uk

Samantha Jac-During
Communications Associate

Samantha has recently finished her Masters Degree in International Communications and Media. Whilst studying, Samantha began tutoring at Explore Learning where she discovered a passion for serving and impacting the lives of children through the means of education, but also through relationships. Currently, working as the Communications Associate for both Feltham Convening Project and Reach Foundation, Samantha hopes to use her knowledge and experience in communications to help impact children and young people. It is her desire to see children and young people live their lives to its full potential whilst enjoying every single aspect of their childhood, as much as possible.  Besides communications, Samantha enjoys watching a variety of youtube channels, old television series, such as Criminal Minds and other real-life documentaries.

samantha.jac-during@reachfoundation.org.uk

Annette Eduvie
Programme Administrator

Annette Eduvié is currently working as the Programme Administrator for the Feltham Convening Project, The Reach Foundation. A Law LLB graduate with a background in Administration, she has taken a keen interest in Policy in action and discovered her passion for her community. Annette has also been deeply involved in Church Administration and Development. She would like to see a local and eventually global community where people can achieve what they set their minds to and can enjoy the benefits of working together for the prosperity of the collective. Super interested in the Arts, Annette spends a lot of her other time listening to music, and watching movies – Nollywood is her favourite. 

annette.eduvie@reachfoundation.org.uk

Roles & forms of participation for different local stakeholders

If it is to be as effective, the convening project needs to engage with a wide variety of different local stakeholders, providing a range of different ways for people to feed into decisions, based on their capacity, interests, professional remits, and preferences. 

Here are just a few of the ways people can choose to actively participate in meaningful decision-making through the project and have their voices heard: 

Image
Smiling cartoon lady
The young person keen to represent their generation and push for change through the steering group

We’re going to have at least two young people aged between 16 and 25 on the steering group for the project. We’ll support them to feel comfortable and confident putting forward their views on an equal footing with others, providing training and mentoring as needed. The young people on the steering group may get involved with peer research, finding out more about other local young people’s views in order to feed into the group’s decision-making. 

Image
Man with glasses cartoon
The busy parent making themselves heard through community meetings

There may well be local parents who don’t have the time or inclination to join a working group or a steering group, but want to ensure their voices are heard on issues they’re passionate about, and are keen to hold senior decision-makers to account. Through the community meetings we will hold, they will be able to find out more about decisions being made, and there will be a clear process through which they can have a say on them. Some may choose to get more heavily involved via a working group or steering group, but they don’t have to.

Image
Lady with topknot cartoon
The senior decision-maker helping guide the project through the steering group

The steering group will include senior decision-makers from a range of local services, agencies and institutions that work with babies, children, young people and families. These decision-makers will work with the local residents on the steering group to guide the overall direction of the project – deciding priority areas, directing their staff to attend working groups, analysing relevant data and research, commissioning additional insight gathering, and liaising with working groups to help craft the project’s activities.

Image
Man with tie cartoon
The local professional helping push forward innovative new approaches through a working group

The working groups will contain a mix of operational staff from relevant local organisations, services, and agencies, and local residents who are working on or interested in the particular issues that are focused on in the groups. A senior social worker, for instance, could be part of a working group, and could help to shape the initiatives that the working group agrees to instigate. This could involve them going back to their team and trying out new approaches, or new partnerships, and then reporting back to the working group on progress. 

Image
Lady with long hair cartoon
The local parent helping drive and shape the project through the steering group

The steering group will include parents as key stakeholders, who will work with senior decision-makers and young people to steer the overall direction of the project. The planning team will support and mentor the parents for these roles, as needed, and will ensure they feel comfortable putting across their views. Parents on the steering group may well speak openly and frankly about their own experiences bringing up children in the local area, as well as contributing to strategic decision-making. They may be involved in leading community research.

Image
Smiling man cartoon
The local young person passionate about one specific issue, helping guide the initiatives being developed to address that issue through a working group

There may be young people who are really keen to contribute to one specific aspect of the project, due to their personal insights and experiences, or the things they’re passionate about. They may not wish to commit to the steering group, but could be incredibly valuable participants in a working group, helping to remind everyone of what’s at stake, and enriching the conversation and decision-making with their lived experience.